Heritage Environmental Services, LLC Acquired Rineco Chemical Industries

Heritage Environmental Services, LLC Acquired Rineco Chemical Industries

 Acquisition enables Rineco to provide customers a one-stop-shop for all their waste handling and technology needs.

 

Now, with our combined best-in-class capabilities, all of your waste service needs, including incineration, fuel blending, landfill, wastewater treatment, recycling, transportation, and data tracking will be taken care of all under one roof and by one supplier. This makes the handling of your hazardous waste, by-product management, and recycling easier than ever. As always, we will continue to be committed to customer service excellence and exceeding your expectations.

This partnership is a natural progression of our relationship – our two companies have worked with each other for over twenty-five years. We share the same core values, commitment to safety, and respect for compliance. Together, we are committed to providing our customers with innovative solutions to meet their environmental and sustainability needs.

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year –

Rineco would like to wish you and your families a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Thank you for the opportunity to handle your waste disposal needs this year.  We look forward to working with each of you in 2017.

Rineco Conference Booth

FET Conference

FET Conference – Rineco

Tuesday, October 25th – Thursday, October 27th

Country Springs Hotel & Conference Center, Pewaukee, WI

This Conference is held for three days each year in October. On day one a number of courses are available to choose from. On day two you have a full session and is followed by 30 other sessions.

In addition to attending the conference visit our display at booth 7. This conference is great for training, data gathering, and networking. This is relevant to businesses seeking common solutions to issues in our field.

LSWA Conference

Rineco will be exhibiting in the LSWA Environmental Conference in Lafayette, LA next week, March 17-18.  Please come by and see us at booth 34.

Rineco – Who we areRineco’s innovative technology differentiates us within the industry. Through this technology, we have maintained a proud tradition of managing a broad range of material and container types.

With a record of competence and fast response, our programs allow us to handle wastes such as solvents, paints, washes, resins, cosmetics, printing inks and refinery waste. But unlike many companies which can process only liquid wastes, Rineco can also process tough sludges and even rock-hard solids. Examples of these solids include: visqueen, towels, gloves, empty containers, rags, filter cartridges, rubber boots, and reacted epoxy resins. Rineco accepts waste material in any DOT approved shipping container, from individual paint cans to roll-offs. Before Rineco accepts any waste, we profile and carefully analyze it to ensure complete compatibility with our processes and with all regulations. It is screened for pesticides, PCB’s, halogen content and much more.

OUR HERITAGE
Rineco was founded in 1986 for the purpose of developing regulated waste fuel blending. Through the use of a solid and liquid blending process, Rineco manufactures waste-derived fuel that is used as a secondary fuel source to replace coal and natural gas in cement kilns. Private ownership purchased Production Fuels of Arkansas that year, and changed the name of the company to Rineco.

Rineco is an innovative waste management company centrally located in Haskell, Arkansas, 30 miles southwest of Little Rock. Since its founding, Rineco has established itself as a dynamic leader in the waste management industry servicing over 2,500 large and small quantity generators throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico and numerous Fortune 500 companies. Rineco is situated on 273 acres of heavy industrial limited zoned land.

Operating on the “Cradle to Grave” philosophy on which the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act was founded, Rineco ensures waste materials are managed safely and in compliance with all regulations. Under the RCRA Part B permit, our permit allows for storage of 11,896 55-gallon drum equivalents of containers and 240,000 gallons of tank storage capacity. Our process, financial stability and capabilities have allowed us to be a leader in the industry.

Over the years, Rineco has grown into a total waste management company offering all aspects of environmental services and waste management for fuel and non-fuel streams alike. Rineco provides a one source solution for the diverse waste management needs of businesses. We are fully permitted and committed to minimizing your risk and liability by providing safe and efficient waste material handling through a single INNOVATIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT company.

Mission Statement
Rineco will provide industry with efficient, regulatory compliant and cost effective environmental services while protecting human health and the environment.

Rineco is committed to:

responsible waste management practices that protect human health and the environmental resource conservation and recovery.
maintaining a completely accident free facility safety record.
maintaining an unprecedented level of customer satisfaction.
advising customers on the safe use, transportation, recycling, recovery, disposal and minimization of waste material.
identifying and implementing pollution prevention measure in facility operations through source reduction and waste minimization.
promptly reporting to officials, employees, customers and the public, information on waste-related health and environmental issues, and to recommend protective measures.
recognizing and responding to community concerns about regulated waste and facility operations.
taking an active role in creating responsible laws, regulations, and standards to safeguard the community, workplace and environment.

2015 Christmas Picture

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year –

Rineco would like to wish you and your families a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Thank you for the opportunity to handle your waste disposal needs this year.  We look forward to working with each of you in 2016.

Rineco – Who we areRineco’s innovative technology differentiates us within the industry. Through this technology, we have maintained a proud tradition of managing a broad range of material and container types.

With a record of competence and fast response, our programs allow us to handle wastes such as solvents, paints, washes, resins, cosmetics, printing inks and refinery waste. But unlike many companies which can process only liquid wastes, Rineco can also process tough sludges and even rock-hard solids. Examples of these solids include: visqueen, towels, gloves, empty containers, rags, filter cartridges, rubber boots, and reacted epoxy resins. Rineco accepts waste material in any DOT approved shipping container, from individual paint cans to roll-offs. Before Rineco accepts any waste, we profile and carefully analyze it to ensure complete compatibility with our processes and with all regulations. It is screened for pesticides, PCB’s, halogen content and much more.

OUR HERITAGE
Rineco was founded in 1986 for the purpose of developing regulated waste fuel blending. Through the use of a solid and liquid blending process, Rineco manufactures waste-derived fuel that is used as a secondary fuel source to replace coal and natural gas in cement kilns. Private ownership purchased Production Fuels of Arkansas that year, and changed the name of the company to Rineco.

Rineco is an innovative waste management company centrally located in Haskell, Arkansas, 30 miles southwest of Little Rock. Since its founding, Rineco has established itself as a dynamic leader in the waste management industry servicing over 2,500 large and small quantity generators throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico and numerous Fortune 500 companies. Rineco is situated on 273 acres of heavy industrial limited zoned land.

Operating on the “Cradle to Grave” philosophy on which the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act was founded, Rineco ensures waste materials are managed safely and in compliance with all regulations. Under the RCRA Part B permit, our permit allows for storage of 11,896 55-gallon drum equivalents of containers and 240,000 gallons of tank storage capacity. Our process, financial stability and capabilities have allowed us to be a leader in the industry.

Over the years, Rineco has grown into a total waste management company offering all aspects of environmental services and waste management for fuel and non-fuel streams alike. Rineco provides a one source solution for the diverse waste management needs of businesses. We are fully permitted and committed to minimizing your risk and liability by providing safe and efficient waste material handling through a single INNOVATIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT company.

Safety Award

Rineco Safety Award – The Director of the Arkansas Department of Labor has announced the Rineco Chemical Industries, located in Benton, AR, is the recipient of a One(1) Year Accumulative Safety Award.

Two hundred ninety-nine (299) employees have accumulated one (1) year without a lost day away from work due to a work-related injury or illness between July 13, 2014 and July 13, 2015.

Rineco has a safety program in effect and a safety committee made up of both employees and management.

The Arkansas Department of Labor, the Arkansas Insurance Department and the Arkansas Workers’ Compensation Commission are pleased to present this award to Arkansas companies who excel in on-the-job safety.

Safety Award

Innovative

Rineco’s innovative technology differentiates us within the industry. Through this technology, we have maintained a proud tradition of managing a broad range of material and container types.

With a record of competence and fast response, our programs allow us to handle wastes such as solvents, paints, washes, resins, cosmetics, printing inks and refinery waste. But unlike many companies which can process only liquid wastes, Rineco can also process tough sludges and even rock-hard solids. Examples of these solids include: visqueen, towels, gloves, empty containers, rags, filter cartridges, rubber boots, and reacted epoxy resins. Rineco accepts waste material in any DOT approved shipping container, from individual paint cans to roll-offs. Before Rineco accepts any waste, we profile and carefully analyze it to ensure complete compatibility with our processes and with all regulations. It is screened for pesticides, PCB’s, halogen content and much more.

OUR HERITAGE

Rineco was founded in 1986 for the purpose of developing regulated waste fuel blending. Through the use of a solid and liquid blending process, Rineco manufactures waste-derived fuel that is used as a secondary fuel source to replace coal and natural gas in cement kilns. Private ownership purchased Production Fuels of Arkansas that year, and changed the name of the company to Rineco.

Rineco is an innovative waste management company centrally located in Haskell, Arkansas, 30 miles southwest of Little Rock. Since its founding, Rineco has established itself as a dynamic leader in the waste management industry servicing over 2,500 large and small quantity generators throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico and numerous Fortune 500 companies. Rineco is situated on 273 acres of heavy industrial limited zoned land.

Operating on the “Cradle to Grave” philosophy on which the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act was founded, Rineco ensures waste materials are managed safely and in compliance with all regulations. Under the RCRA Part B permit, our permit allows for storage of 11,896 55-gallon drum equivalents of containers and 240,000 gallons of tank storage capacity. Our process, financial stability and capabilities have allowed us to be a leader in the industry.

Over the years, Rineco has grown into a total waste management company offering all aspects of environmental services and waste management for fuel and non-fuel streams alike. Rineco provides a one source solution for the diverse waste management needs of businesses. We are fully permitted and committed to minimizing your risk and liability by providing safe and efficient waste material handling through a single INNOVATIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT company.

Rineco Diamond

End of the year

End of the Year

The end of the year 2015 is quickly approaching which means deadlines are right around the corner. This is a great time to clean out your obsolete, out dated products and inventories.  Please contact your Sales or Customer Service Representative today and let us help you start 2016 fresh.

Rineco Conference Booth

AEF Conference

Rineco will be exhibiting in the AEF Conference this week in Hot Springs, AR. The conference is being held at the Hot Springs Convention Center on October 1-2.  Come by and see us at booths 3-4.

ineco – Who we areRineco’s innovative technology differentiates us within the industry. Through this technology, we have maintained a proud tradition of managing a broad range of material and container types.

With a record of competence and fast response, our programs allow us to handle wastes such as solvents, paints, washes, resins, cosmetics, printing inks and refinery waste. But unlike many companies which can process only liquid wastes, Rineco can also process tough sludges and even rock-hard solids. Examples of these solids include: visqueen, towels, gloves, empty containers, rags, filter cartridges, rubber boots, and reacted epoxy resins. Rineco accepts waste material in any DOT approved shipping container, from individual paint cans to roll-offs. Before Rineco accepts any waste, we profile and carefully analyze it to ensure complete compatibility with our processes and with all regulations. It is screened for pesticides, PCB’s, halogen content and much more.

UR HERITAGE
Rineco was founded in 1986 for the purpose of developing regulated waste fuel blending. Through the use of a solid and liquid blending process, Rineco manufactures waste-derived fuel that is used as a secondary fuel source to replace coal and natural gas in cement kilns. Private ownership purchased Production Fuels of Arkansas that year, and changed the name of the company to Rineco.

Rineco is an innovative waste management company centrally located in Haskell, Arkansas, 30 miles southwest of Little Rock. Since its founding, Rineco has established itself as a dynamic leader in the waste management industry servicing over 2,500 large and small quantity generators throughout the United States, Canada, Mexico and numerous Fortune 500 companies. Rineco is situated on 273 acres of heavy industrial limited zoned land.

Operating on the “Cradle to Grave” philosophy on which the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act was founded, Rineco ensures waste materials are managed safely and in compliance with all regulations. Under the RCRA Part B permit, our permit allows for storage of 11,896 55-gallon drum equivalents of containers and 240,000 gallons of tank storage capacity. Our process, financial stability and capabilities have allowed us to be a leader in the industry.

Over the years, Rineco has grown into a total waste management company offering all aspects of environmental services and waste management for fuel and non-fuel streams alike. Rineco provides a one source solution for the diverse waste management needs of businesses. We are fully permitted and committed to minimizing your risk and liability by providing safe and efficient waste material handling through a single INNOVATIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT company.

Mission Statement
Rineco will provide industry with efficient, regulatory compliant and cost effective environmental services while protecting human health and the environment.

Rineco is committed to:

responsible waste management practices that protect human health and the environmental resource conservation and recovery.
maintaining a completely accident free facility safety record.
maintaining an unprecedented level of customer satisfaction.
advising customers on the safe use, transportation, recycling, recovery, disposal and minimization of waste material.
identifying and implementing pollution prevention measure in facility operations through source reduction and waste minimization.
promptly reporting to officials, employees, customers and the public, information on waste-related health and environmental issues, and to recommend protective measures.
recognizing and responding to community concerns about regulated waste and facility operations.
taking an active role in creating responsible laws, regulations, and standards to safeguard the community, workplace and environment.

Regulatory Assurances

Rineco’s commitment to safety and regulatory excellence is demonstrated in our programs, policies, and achievements.

Fully permitted Part B facility
Daily facility inspections
On-site inspector program with Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ)
Semi-annual ADEQ inspections. EPA Region VI inspections are at the discretion of the agency
All production areas have a 1/4″ welded steel overlay on the concrete floor
Standard Operation Procedures developed by industry safety expert
Annual industrial hygiene audits by outside consulting firm
Rineco has earned numerous Arkansas Department of Labor awards
$25 million Pollution Liability Insurance coverage
All process equipment has CO2 inerting, oxygen analyzers with interlocks, infared cameras, and are vented to thermal oxidation units.
Compliance

Our Waste Compliance team consists of professionals with over 30 years of experience in the energy industry. We provide a complete portfolio of regulatory compliance, environmental & safety solutions that integrate with your business units. We deliver easily understood processes and procedures written by industry veterans that will help you to operate efficiently within legislated rules and regulations.

We deliver Regulatory Compliance expertise where you need it, when you need it.

We partner with you to provide continuous improvement and coaching of your staff functions in order to manage and maintain compliance over the long-term.

Providing you with professional, experienced consultants with over 30 years of experience in operations, environmental, safety & regulatory compliance. Our value is in minimizing the risk of non-compliance, financial penalties and shutdown.

We become a part of your team, we believe in staff augmentation support and continual process improvements.

Zero Waste

Zero Waste

At Yellowstone National Park, the clear soda cups and white utensils are not your typical cafe-counter garbage. Made of plant-based plastics, they dissolve magically when heated for more than a few minutes.At Ecco, a popular restaurant in Atlanta, waiters no longer scrape food scraps into the trash bin. Uneaten morsels are dumped into five-gallon pails and taken to a compost heap out back.

And at eight of its North American plants, Honda is recycling so diligently that the factories have gotten rid of their trash Dumpsters altogether.

Across the nation, an antigarbage strategy known as “zero waste” is moving from the fringes to the mainstream, taking hold in school cafeterias, national parks, restaurants, stadiums and corporations.

The movement is simple in concept if not always in execution: Produce less waste. Shun polystyrene foam containers or any other packaging that is not biodegradable. Recycle or compost whatever you can.

Though born of idealism, the zero-waste philosophy is now propelled by sobering realities, like the growing difficulty of securing permits for new landfills and an awareness that organic decay in landfills releases methane that helps warm the earth’s atmosphere.

“Nobody wants a landfill sited anywhere near them, including in rural areas,” said Jon D. Johnston, a materials management branch chief for the Environmental Protection Agency who is helping to lead the zero-waste movement in the Southeast. “We’ve come to this realization that landfill is valuable and we can’t bury things that don’t need to be buried.”

Americans are still the undisputed champions of trash, dumping 4.6 pounds per person per day, according to the E.P.A.’s most recent figures. More than half of that ends up in landfills or is incinerated.

But places like the island resort community of Nantucket offer a glimpse of the future. Running out of landfill space and worried about the cost of shipping trash 30 miles to the mainland, it moved to a strict trash policy more than a decade ago, said Jeffrey Willett, director of public works on the island.

The town, with the blessing of residents concerned about tax increases, mandates the recycling not only of commonly reprocessed items like aluminum, glass and paper but also of tires, batteries and household appliances.

Jim Lentowski, executive director of the nonprofit Nantucket Conservation Foundation and a year-round resident since 1971, said that sorting trash and delivering it to the local recycling and disposal complex had become a matter of course for most residents.

The complex also has a garagelike structure where residents can drop off books and clothing and other reusable items for others to take home.

The 100-car parking lot at the landfill is a lively meeting place for locals, Mr. Lentowski added. “Saturday morning during election season, politicians hang out there and hand out campaign buttons,” he said. “If you want to get a pulse on the community, that is a great spot to go.”

Mr. Willett said that while the amount of trash that island residents carted to the dump had remained steady, the proportion going into the landfill had plummeted to 8 percent.

By contrast, Massachusetts residents as a whole send an average of 66 percent of their trash to a landfill or incinerator. Although Mr. Willett has lectured about the Nantucket model around the country, most communities still lack the infrastructure to set a zero-waste target.

Aside from the difficulty of persuading residents and businesses to divide their trash, many towns and municipalities have been unwilling to make the significant capital investments in machines like composters that can process food and yard waste. Yet attitudes are shifting, and cities like San Francisco and Seattle are at the forefront of the changeover. Both of those cities have adopted plans for a shift to zero-waste practices and are collecting organic waste curbside in residential areas for composting.

Food waste, which the E.P.A. says accounts for about 13 percent of total trash nationally — and much more when recyclables are factored out of the total — is viewed as the next big frontier.

When apple cores, stale bread and last week’s leftovers go to landfills, they do not return the nutrients they pulled from the soil while growing. What is more, when sealed in landfills without oxygen, organic materials release methane, a potent heat-trapping gas, as they decompose. If composted, however, the food can be broken down and returned to the earth as a nonchemical fertilizer with no methane by-product.

Green Foodservice Alliance, a division of the Georgia Restaurant Association, has been adding restaurants throughout Atlanta and its suburbs to its so-called zero-waste zones. And companies are springing up to meet the growth in demand from restaurants for recycling and compost haulers.

Steve Simon, a partner in Fifth Group, a company that owns Ecco and four other restaurants in the Atlanta area, said that the hardest part of participating in the alliance’s zero-waste-zone program was not training his staff but finding reliable haulers.

“There are now two in town, and neither is a year old, so it is a very tentative situation,” Mr. Simon said.

Still, he said he had little doubt that the hauling sector would grow and that all five of the restaurants would eventually be waste-free.

Packaging is also quickly evolving as part of the zero-waste movement. Bioplastics like the forks at Yellowstone, made from plant materials like cornstarch that mimic plastic, are used to manufacture a growing number of items that are compostable.

Steve Mojo, executive director of the Biodegradable Products Institute, a nonprofit organization that certifies such products, said that the number of companies making compostable products for food service providers had doubled since 2006 and that many had moved on to items like shopping bags and food packaging.

The transition to zero waste, however, has its pitfalls.

Josephine Miller, an environmental official for the city of Santa Monica, Calif., which bans the use of polystyrene foam containers, said that some citizens had unwittingly put the plant-based alternatives into cans for recycling, where they had melted and had gummed up the works. Yellowstone and some institutions have asked manufacturers to mark some biodegradable items with a brown or green stripe.

Yet even with these clearer design cues, customers will have to be taught to think about the destination of every throwaway if the zero-waste philosophy is to prevail, environmental officials say.

“Technology exists, but a lot of education still needs to be done,” said Mr. Johnston of the E.P.A.

He expects private companies and businesses to move faster than private citizens because momentum can be driven by one person at the top.

“It will take a lot longer to get average Americans to compost,” Mr. Johnston said. “Reaching down to my household and yours is the greatest challenge.”

Food waste costs North America $162 billion

Food waste costs North America $162 billion, finds new study

Food waste in America amounts to $162 billion and between 31% to 40% of American food supply goes to waste, primarily in homes, stores and restaurants, according to a new study.

The findings, from the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future (CLF) at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, were published in a report in the journal PLOS ONE.

Top food wasted, by weight, include fruit and vegetables yet nearly 75% of Americans believe that they waste less food than the national average, according to the findings.

Furthermore, as a result the food waste places a huge drain on the environment when approximately 30% of the fertiliser, 35% of the fresh water and 31% of the cropland in the US was used to grow food that was eventually wasted.

[Native Advertisement]

The first nationally representative consumer survey focused on wasted food sheds some light on factors affecting consumers’ waste.

The survey, administered to 1,010 American consumers in April 2014, covered awareness, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors related to wasted food.

Despite the large environmental impacts related to wasted food, most survey respondents listed environmental concerns last when ranking reasons to reduce food waste, with just 10% calling them “very important.”

Instead, respondents said that saving money and setting a positive example for children were the top motivators for wanting to throw out less food.

When listing reasons why they toss food out before eating it, consumers gave the top reasons as food safety concerns and a desire to eat only the freshest food.

Meanwhile, 41% of those who composted were not concerned about how much food they wasted.

“Americans perceive themselves as wasting very little food, but in reality, we are wasting substantial quantities,” said study leader Roni Neff, PhD, director of the Food System Sustainability & Public Health Program at CLF and an assistant professor in the Bloomberg School’s Department of Environmental Health Sciences. “It happens throughout the food chain, including both a lot of waste by consumers, and a lot on our behalf, when businesses think we won’t buy imperfect food. The root causes are complex.”

“The survey results are especially relevant for three groups,” Neff said. “For educators working to reduce food waste, a key finding is that highlighting financial savings may resonate more with consumers than other types of messaging. But there is still a need to explain the environmental effects of wasting food. For policymakers, our findings suggest a priority on making date labels clear and consistent, and encoding sell-by labels so they do not mislead consumers. And for businesses, the survey highlights changes consumers want, like offering re-sealable bags and smaller product sizes, and discounting damaged or near-expiration foods.”